The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works

The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works

This collection of Nashe's finest works includes The Unfortunate Traveller, the sharp and grotesque tale of Jack Wilton, an Englishman travelling through Europe; Pierce Penniless, a biting satire on the society of his age; Terrors of the ...

Author: Thomas Nashe

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141905563

Category: Fiction

Page: 512

View: 974

Written in the late sixteenth century, at the pinnacle of the English Renaissance, the rich and ingenious works of Thomas Nashe uniquely reveal the ambivant nature of the Elizabethan era. Mingling the devout and the bawdy, scholarship and slang, they express throughout an irrepressible, inexhaustible wit and an astonishing command of language. This collection of Nashe's finest works includes The Unfortunate Traveller, the sharp and grotesque tale of Jack Wilton, an Englishman travelling through Europe; Pierce Penniless, a biting satire on the society of his age; Terrors of the Night; Lenten Stuff; the sensual poem The Choice of Valentines; and extracts from Christ's Tears over Jerusalem and other works. Wide-ranging in subject, all capture the unique voice and fantastic ingenuity of one of the most entertaining Elizabethan writers - a man regarded by his contemporaries as the 'English Juvenal'.
Categories: Fiction

The Unfortunate Traveller Or the Life of Jack Wilton with an Essay on the Life and Writings of Thomas Nash

The Unfortunate Traveller  Or  the Life of Jack Wilton  with an Essay on the Life and Writings of Thomas Nash

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Edmund Gosse

Publisher: Sagwan Press

ISBN: 1298948479

Category:

Page: 268

View: 571

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Mysterious and the Foreign in Early Modern England

The Mysterious and the Foreign in Early Modern England

In The Works of Thomas Nashe. 5 vols. Edited by R. B. McKerrow, 2:7–186. Oxford: Blackwell, 1966. ———. Lenten Stuffe. In The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works. Edited by J. B. Steane. Harmondsworth, UK: Penguin, 1972. ———.

Author: Helen Ostovich

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN: 9780874139549

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 318

View: 894

"The essays collected in this volume explore many of the most interesting, and some of the more surprising, reactions of English people in the early modern period to their encounters with the mysterious and the foreign. In this period the small and peripheral nation of English speakers first explored the distant world from the Arctic, to the tropics of the Americas, to the exotic East, and snowy wastes of Russia, recording its impressions and adventures in an equally wide variety of literary genres. Nearer home, fresh encounters with the mysterious world of the Ottoman Empire and the lure of the Holy Land, and, of course, with the evocative wonders of Italy, provide equally rich accounts for the consumption of a reading and theatergoing public. This growing public proved to be, in some cases, naive and gullible, in others urbanely sophisticated in its reactions to "otherness," or frankly incredulous of travelers' tales."--BOOK JACKET.
Categories: Literary Collections

Aemilia Lanyer as Shakespeare s Co Author

Aemilia Lanyer as Shakespeare   s Co Author

Nashe, “ e Unfortunate Traveller,” in Thomas Nashe: The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works ed. J.B. Steane (London: Penguin, 1985), 339. 55. A Midsummer Night's Dream (5.1.157, 162–163). 56. A Midsummer Night's Dream (5.1.184). 57.

Author: Mark Bradbeer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000567212

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 650

This book presents original material which indicates that Aemilia Lanyer – female writer, feminist, and Shakespeare contemporary – is Shakespeare’s hidden and arguably most significant co-author. Once dismissed as the mere paramour of Shakespeare’s patron, Lord Hunsdon, she is demonstrated to be a most articulate forerunner of #MeToo fury. Building on previous research into the authorship of Shakespeare’s works, Bradbeer offers evidence in the form of three case studies which signal Aemilia’s collaboration with Shakespeare. The first case study matches the works of "George Wilkins" – who is currently credited as the co-author of the feminist Shakespeare play Pericles (1608) – with Aemilia Lanyer’s writing style, education, feminism and knowledge of Lord Hunsdon’s secret sexual life. The second case-study recognizes Titus Andronicus (1594), a play containing the characters Aemilius and Bassianus, to be a revision of the suppressed play Titus and Vespasian (1592), as authored by the unmarried pregnant Aemilia Bassano, as she then was. Lastly, it is argued that Shakespeare’s clowns, Bottom, Launce, Malvolio, Dromio, Dogberry, Jaques, and Moth, arise in her deeply personal war with the misogynist Thomas Nashe. Each case study reveals new aspects of Lanyer’s feminist activism and involvement in Shakespeare’s work, and allows for a deeper analysis and appreciation of the plays. This research will prove provocative to students and scholars of Shakespeare studies, English literature, literary history, and gender studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Disgust in Early Modern English Literature

Disgust in Early Modern English Literature

̄ In The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works. Edited by J.B. Steane, 251¥370. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972. Ngai, Sianne. Ugly Feelings. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. Ong, Walter J. Interfaces of the Word: Studies in ...

Author: Natalie K. Eschenbaum

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317149613

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 262

What is the role of disgust or revulsion in early modern English literature? How did early modern English subjects experience revulsion and how did writers represent it in poetry, plays, and prose? What does it mean when literature instructs, delights, and disgusts? This collection of essays looks at the treatment of disgust in texts by Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Herrick, and others to demonstrate how disgust, perhaps more than other affects, gives us a more complex understanding of early modern culture. Dealing with descriptions of coagulated eye drainage, stinky leeks, and blood-filled fleas, among other sensational things, the essays focus on three kinds of disgusting encounters: sexual, cultural, and textual. Early modern English writers used disgust to explore sexual mores, describe encounters with foreign cultures, and manipulate their readers' responses. The essays in this collection show how writers deployed disgust to draw, and sometimes to upset, the boundaries that had previously defined acceptable and unacceptable behaviors, people, and literatures. Together they present the compelling argument that a critical understanding of early modern cultural perspectives requires careful attention to disgust.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Aerial Environments on the Early Modern Stage

Aerial Environments on the Early Modern Stage

The Unfortunate Traveller ' and Other Works , ed . J. B. Steane . London : Penguin , 1971 . Nashe , Thomas . Christ's Tears Over Jerusalem . In ' The Unfortunate Traveller ' and Other Works , ed . J. B. Steane .

Author: CHLOE KATHLEEN. PREEDY

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192843326

Category:

Page: 353

View: 778

During the early days of the professional English theatre, dramatists including Dekker, Greene, Heywood, Jonson, Marlowe, Middleton, and Shakespeare wrote for playhouses that, though enclosed by surrounding walls, remained open to the ambient air and the sky above. The drama written for performance at these open-air venues drew attention to and reflected on its own relationship to the space of the air. At a time when theories of the imagination emphasized dramatic performance's reliance upon and implication in the air from and through which its staged fictions were presented and received, plays written for performance at open-air venues frequently draw attention to the nature and significance of that elemental relationship. Aerial Environments on the Early Modern Stage considers the various ways in which the air is brought into presence within early modern drama, analyzing more than a hundred works that were performed at the London open-air playhouses between 1576 and 1609, with reference to theatrical atmospheres and aerial encounters. It explores how various theatrical effects and staging strategies foregrounded early modern drama's relationship to, and impact on, the actual playhouse air. In considering open-air drama's pervasive and ongoing attention to aerial imagery, actions, and representational strategies, the book suggest that playwrights and their companies developed a dramaturgical awareness that extended from the earth to encompass and make explicit the space of air.
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The Age of Thomas Nashe

The Age of Thomas Nashe

My particular focus emphasizes the direct association of literary form with the schematics of the human body. ... Thomas Nashe, The Unfortunate Traveller and Other Works, J.B. Steane, ed., (New York: Penguin, 1971).

Author: Stephen Guy-Bray

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317045342

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 483

Traditional literary criticism once treated Thomas Nashe as an Elizabethan oddity, difficult to understand or value. He was described as an unrestrained stylist, venomous polemicist, unreliable source, and closet pornographer. But today this flamboyant writer sits at the center of many trends in early modern scholarship. Nashe’s varied output fuels efforts to reconsider print culture and the history of the book, histories of sexuality and pornography, urban culture, the changing nature of patronage, the relationship between theater and print, and evolving definitions of literary authorship and 'literature' as such. This collection brings together a dozen scholars of Elizabethan literature to characterize the current state of Nashe scholarship and shape its emerging future. The Age of Thomas Nashe demonstrates how the works of a restless, improvident, ambitious young writer, driven by radical invention and a desperate search for literary order, can restructure critical thinking about this familiar era. These essays move beyond individual and generic conceptions of authorship to show how Nashe’s career unveils the changing imperatives of literary production in late sixteenth-century England. Thomas Nashe becomes both a marker of the historical milieu of his time and a symbolic pointer gesturing towards emerging features of modern authorship.
Categories: Literary Criticism