The Governance of ROME

The Governance of ROME

who held local office in their home community were granted Roman citizenship without being transferred to Rome, ... allies and communities affiliated with Rome became progressively restricted in the exercise of local self-government.

Author: K. Loewenstein

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401024006

Category: History

Page: 502

View: 373

Next to the Bible, Shakespeare, the French revolution and Napoleon, ancient Rome is one of the most plowed-through fields of historical experience. One of the truly great periods of history, Rome, over the centuries, deservedly has attracted the passionate attention of historians, philologists and, more recently, archeologists. Since Roman law constituted the source of the legal life of most of Western Europe, the legal profession had a legitimate interest. Veritable libraries have been built around the history of Rome. In the past confmed mostly to Italian, German, and French scholars the fascination with things Roman by now has spread to other civilized nations in cluding the Anglo-Saxon. Among the contributors to our knowledge of ancient Rome are some of the great minds in history and law. Our bibliography - selective, as neces sarily it has to be - records outstanding generalists as well as some of the numerous specialists that were helpful for our undertaking. Why, then, another study of the Roman political civilization and one that, at least measured by volume and effort, is not altogether insubstantial? And why, has to be added, one presented by an author who, whatever his reputation in other fields, ostensibly is an outsider of the classical discipline? These are legitimate questions that should be honestly answered. By training and avocation the author is a constitutional lawyer or, rather, a political scientist primarily interested in the operation of governmental institutions.
Categories: History

Pompey Cato and the Governance of the Roman Empire

Pompey  Cato  and the Governance of the Roman Empire

I argued in chapter 1 that Pompey, as consul in 70, pursued a policy designed to improve the government of Rome's provinces. This chapter examines how he continued that policy in his eastern campaigns of the 60s, even while claiming the ...

Author: Kit Morrell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191071249

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 189

Provincial governance under the Roman republic has long been notorious for its corrupt officials and greedy tax-farmers, though this is far from being the whole story. This book challenges the traditional picture, contending that leading late republican citizens were more concerned about the problems of their empire than is generally recognized, and took effective steps to address them. Attempts to improve provincial governance over the period 70-50 BC are examined in depth, with a particular focus on the contributions of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey) and the younger Marcus Porcius Cato. These efforts ranged well beyond the sanctions of the extortion law, encompassing show trials and model governors, and drawing on principles of moral philosophy. In 52-50 BC they culminated in a coordinated reform programme which combined far-sighted administrative change with a concerted attempt to transform the ethos of provincial governance: the union of what Cicero called 'Cato's policy' of ethical governance with Pompey's lex de provinciis, a law which transformed the very nature of provincial command. Though more familiar as political opponents, Pompey and Cato were united in their interest in good governance and were capable of working alongside each other to effect positive change. This book demonstrates that it was their eventual collaboration, in the late 50s BC, that produced the republic's most significant programme of provincial reform. In the process, it offers a new perspective on these two key figures as well as an enriched understanding of provincial governance in the late Roman republic.
Categories: History

The Government of the Roman Empire

The Government of the Roman Empire

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years.

Author: Dr Barbara Levick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134572649

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 544

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.
Categories: History

The Capacity to Govern

The Capacity to Govern

This is the first Report dealing with governance commissioned and approved by the Club of Rome, testifying to the significance of this book.

Author: Yehezkel Dror

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136342394

Category: Political Science

Page: 280

View: 391

The inadequacies of contemporary forms of governance are increasingly recognized: the brain drain from politics, distrust of governments, the danger of mass media and money-dominated elections, and the failure of governments to find good policy options on major issues. Industry, civil society and non-governmental organizations, however important, cannot compensate for government's incapacity to shape the future, which only it is democratically entitled to do. Radical improvements in governance are urgently needed, but salient proposals are scarce. This book diagnoses contemporary governments as obsolete and proposes changes in values, structures, staffing, public understanding and political culture to equip governance for the radically novel challenges of the 21st century. This is the first Report dealing with governance commissioned and approved by the Club of Rome, testifying to the significance of this book.
Categories: Political Science

The Governance of London

The Governance of London

In what exact relationship the provincial system stood to the city system is not quite clear , but what is of importance to the present enquiry is that the city system was the real foundation of the Roman Government .

Author: George Laurence Gomme

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433075944326

Category: Constitutional history

Page: 418

View: 730

Categories: Constitutional history

Ancient Roman Government

Ancient Roman Government

Our own system of government was deeply influenced by that of the Romans. This invaluable guide traces the development of Roman government from Rome_s legendary kings through its renowned emperors.

Author: Amelie von Zumbusch

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 9781477708859

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 829

Our own system of government was deeply influenced by that of the Romans. This invaluable guide traces the development of Roman government from Rome’s legendary kings through its renowned emperors. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of the Roman Republic and roles played by patricians and plebeians during that period. A useful addition to both history and government collections.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

The Governance of Empire

The Governance of Empire

Rome . As the object of this work is to review those constitutions originally framed by peoples for their own government but who , by force of circumstances , were compelled to extend their provisions to embrace the government of allied ...

Author: Percy Arthur Baxter Silburn

Publisher: London : Longmans, Green

ISBN: UOM:39015024334081

Category: Great Britain

Page: 347

View: 509

Categories: Great Britain

Provinces and Provincial Command in Republican Rome Genesis Development and Governance

Provinces and Provincial Command in Republican Rome  Genesis  Development and Governance

... while the government of Carthage seems to have had limited (if any) direct control over the commander of their army, at least under the Barcid generals.42 Thus Rome's system of dividing military authority by provinciae among equal ...

Author: Díaz Fernández, Alejandro

Publisher: Prensas de la Universidad de Zaragoza

ISBN: 9788447230891

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 241

When the Roman Republic became the master of an overseas empire, the Romans had to adapt their civic institutions so as to be able to rule the dominions that were successively subjected to their imperium. As a result, Rome created an administrative structure mainly based on an element that became the keystone of its empire: the provincia. This book brings together nine contributions from a total of ten scholars, all specialists in Republican Rome and the Principate, who analyse from diverse perspectives and approaches the distinct ways in which the Roman res publica constituted and ruled a far-flung empire. The book ranges from the development of the Roman institutional structures to the diplomatic and administrative activities carried out by the Roman commanders overseas. Beyond the subject on which each author focuses, all chapters in this volume represent significant and renewed contributions to the study of the provinces and the Roman empire during the Republican period and the transition to the Principate.
Categories: History