Science and Nonbelief

Science and Nonbelief

And for any- one inclined toward nonbelief , they looked more like excuses than real solutions . Today , doubters still ask why we should ... reason philosophers usually managed to reconcile reason and revelation 4 Science and Nonbelief.

Author: Taner Edis

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313330786

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 800

Provides an overview of the complex history of the secular tradition of science and its interactions with religions and spiritual traditions
Categories: Science

Divine Action and Natural Selection

Divine Action and Natural Selection

Why Intelligent Design Fails: A Scientific Critique of the New Creationism (2004), co-edited with Matt Young, presents the scientific case against intelligent design. Science and Nonbelief (2006) explores the relationship between modern ...

Author: Joseph Seckbach

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789812834355

Category: Science

Page: 1122

View: 854

The debate between divine action, or faith, and natural selection, or science, is garnering tremendous interest. This book ventures well beyond the usual, contrasting American Protestant and atheistic points of view, and also includes the perspectives of Jews, Muslims, and Roman Catholics. It contains arguments from the various proponents of intelligent design, creationism, and Darwinism, and also covers the sensitive issue of how to incorporate evolution into the secondary school biology curriculum. Comprising contributions from prominent, award-winning authors, the book also contains dialogs following each chapter to provide extra stimulus to the readers and a full picture of this OC hotOCO topic, which delves into the fundamentals of science and religion."
Categories: Science

Reports of the National Center for Science Education

Reports of the National Center for Science Education

Taner Edis's Science and Nonbelief was published as part of the Greenwood Guides to Science and Religion series ( Westport [ CT ] : Greenwood Press , 2005 ) . The publisher writes , “ Can science and religious belief co - exist ?

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:49015003458958

Category: Creationism

Page:

View: 575

Categories: Creationism

An Illusion of Harmony

An Illusion of Harmony

As physicist Taner Edis shows in this fascinating glimpse into contemporary Muslim culture, a good deal of popular writing in Muslim societies attempts to address such perplexing questions as: • Is Islam a "scientific religion"? • Were ...

Author: Taner Edis

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015067656333

Category: Religion

Page: 265

View: 242

Current discussions in the West on the relation of science and religion focus mainly on science's uneasy relationship with the traditional Judeo-Christian view of life. But a parallel controversy exists in the Muslim world regarding ways to integrate science with Islam. As physicist Taner Edis shows in this fascinating glimpse into contemporary Muslim culture, a good deal of popular writing in Muslim societies attempts to address such perplexing questions as: • Is Islam a "scientific religion"? • Were the discoveries of modern science foreshadowed in the Quran? • Are intelligent design conjectures more appealing to the Muslim perspective than Darwinian explanations? Edis examines the range of Muslim thinking about science and Islam, from blatantly pseudoscientific fantasies to comparatively sophisticated efforts to "Islamize science." From the world's strongest creationist movements to bizarre science-in-the-Quran apologetics, popular Muslim approaches promote a view of natural science as a mere fact-collecting activity that coexists in near-perfect harmony with literal-minded faith. Since Muslims are keenly aware that science and technology have been the keys to Western success, they are eager to harness technology to achieve a Muslim version of modernity. Yet at the same time, they are reluctant to allow science to become independent of religion and are suspicious of Western secularization. Edis examines all of these conflicting trends, revealing the difficulties facing Muslim societies trying to adapt to the modern technological world. His discussions of both the parallels and the differences between Western and Muslim attempts to harmonize science and religion make for a unique and intriguing contribution to this continuing debate.
Categories: Religion

Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith

Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith

Journal of the American Scientific Affiliation. Significantly , the curse in Genesis 3 does not mention ... Toil would be added to human labor , making it far less productive outside the garden . a SCIENCE AND NONBELIEF by Taner Edis .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105132647871

Category: Religion and science

Page:

View: 496

Categories: Religion and science

Science and Religion

Science and Religion

For unbelief in America, see James Turner, Without God, without creed: the origins of unbelief in America (Baltimore, 1985), which may be read in conjunc- tion with Herbert Hovenkamp, Science and religion in America, ...

Author: John Hedley Brooke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139952989

Category: Science

Page:

View: 553

John Hedley Brooke offers an introduction and critical guide to one of the most fascinating and enduring issues in the development of the modern world: the relationship between scientific thought and religious belief. It is common knowledge that in western societies there have been periods of crisis when new science has threatened established authority. The trial of Galileo in 1633 and the uproar caused by Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) are two of the most famous examples. Taking account of recent scholarship in the history of science, Brooke takes a fresh look at these and similar episodes, showing that science and religion have been mutually relevant in so rich a variety of ways that no simple generalizations are possible.
Categories: Science

Belief and Unbelief

Belief and Unbelief

Thus, scientific knowledge about the effects of various kinds of conditioning is crucial to political society. It is especially important to those political societies that wish to further the development of as many independent, ...

Author: Michael Novak

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351314183

Category: Religion

Page: 153

View: 286

This is perhaps the most widely read of Michael Novak's books. Belief and Unbelief attempts to push intelligence and articulation as far as possible into the stuff of what so many philosophers set aside as subjectivity. It is an impassioned critique of the idea of an unbridgeable gap between the emotive and the cognitive ? and in its own way, represents a major thrust at positivist analysis. Written in a context of personal tragedy as well as intellectual search, the book is grounded in the belief that human experience is enclosed within a person to person relationship with the source of all things ? sometimes in darkness, other tunes in aridity, but always in deep encounter with community and courage. It is written with a deep fidelity to classical Catholic thought as well as a sense of the writings of sociology, anthropology, and political theory?from Harold Lasswell to Friedrich von Hayek. This third edition includes Novak's brilliant 1961 article "God in the Colleges" from Harper's ? a critique of the technification of university life that rules issues of love, death, and personal destiny out of bounds, and hence leaves aside the mysteries of contingency and risk, in favor of the certainties of research, production, and consumption. For such a "lost generation" Belief and Unbelief will remain of tremendous interest and impact. When the book first appeared thirty years ago, it was praised by naturalists and religious thinkers alike. Sidney Hook called it "a remarkable book, written with verve and distinction." James Collins termed it "a lively and valuable essay from which a reflective, religiously concerned reader can draw immense profit." And The Washington Post reviewer claimed that "Novak has written a rich, relentlessly honest introduction to the problem of belief. It is a deeply personal book, rigorous in argument and open ended in conclusions."
Categories: Religion

The Christian s Plea Against Modern Unbelief

The Christian s Plea Against Modern Unbelief

on the same principles as those of any of the speculative conclusions shown by physical science . It being granted , then , that the legitimate conclusions of science are entitled to prevail over all opinions , however widely held ...

Author: Robert Ainslie Redford

Publisher:

ISBN: COLUMBIA:CR59914084

Category: Apologetics

Page: 566

View: 465

Categories: Apologetics

Tempted to Unbelief

Tempted to Unbelief

This is the Second Article of supreme science . my Creed . If the main doctrines of Religion are true , then , beyond controversy , there is no system of truth in the whole round of the astronomical heavens to compare with it in ...

Author: Enoch Fitch Burr

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015063633849

Category: Skepticism

Page: 234

View: 587

Categories: Skepticism

The Problem of Unbelief in the 16th Century

The Problem of Unbelief in the 16th Century

2 It is true, though, that Descartes and others certainly did experiment on the material world of minerals, animals, and cells and explain them in a new scientific language. Febvre explored the differences between Descartes's science ...

Author: Joseph Tendler

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780429939839

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 986

Febvre asked this core question in The Problem of Unbelief: “Could sixteenth-century people hold religious views that were not those of official, Church-sanctioned Christianity, or could they simply not believe at all?” The answer informed a wider debate on modern history, particularly modern French history. Did the religious attitudes of the Enlightenment and the twentieth century—notably secularism and atheism—first take root in the sixteenth century? Could the spirit of scientific and rational inquiry of the twentieth century have begun with the rejection of God and Christianity by men such as Rabelais, writing in his allegorical novel Gargantua and Pantagruel – the work most often cited as a proto-"atheist" text prior to Febvre's study? The debate hinged on some key differences of interpretation. Was Rabelais mocking the structures of the Christian Church (in which case he might be anticlerical)? Was he mocking the Bible scriptures or Church doctrines (in which case he might be anti-Christian)? Or was he mocking the very idea of God’s existence (in which case he might be an atheist)? The other great contribution that Febvre made to the study of history can be found not so much in the fine detail of this work as in the additions that he made to the historian's toolkit. In this sense, Febvre was highly creative; indeed it can be argued that he ranks among the most creative of all historians. He sought to move the study of history itself beyond its traditional focus on documentary records, arguing instead that close analysis of language could open up a gateway into the ways in which people actually thought, and to their subconscious minds. This concept, the focus on "mentalities," is core to the hugely influential approach of the Annales group of historians, and it enabled a switch in the focus of much historical inquiry, away from the study of elites and their deeds and towards new forms of broader social history. Febvre also used techniques and models drawn from anthropology and sociology to create new ways of framing and answering questions, further extending the range of problems that could be addressed by historians. Working together with colleagues such as Marc Bloch, his understanding of what constituted evidence and of the meanings that could be attributed to it, radically redefined what history is – and what it should aspire to be.
Categories: History