Poetry and Music in Medieval France

Poetry and Music in Medieval France

Robin et Marion displays a close continuity with the process of poetic activity in Arras ; it is strikingly similar ... Poets and musicians were brought over from France , including many from the Arras region such as Perrin d'Agincourt ...

Author: Ardis Butterfield

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521622190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 406

View: 865

In Poetry and Music in Medieval France, first published in 2003, Ardis Butterfield examines vernacular song in medieval France. She begins with the moment when French song first survives in writing in the early thirteenth century, and examines a large corpus of works which combine elements of narrative and song, as well as a range of genres which cross between different musical and literary categories. Emphasising the cosmopolitan artistic milieu of Arras, Butterfield describes the wide range of contexts in which secular songs were quoted and copied, including narrative romances, satires and love poems. She uses manuscript evidence to shed light on medieval perceptions of how music and poetry were composed and interpreted. The volume is well illustrated to demonstrate the rich visual culture of medieval French writing and music. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to both literary and musical scholars of late medieval culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Guillaume de Machaut The Complete Poetry and Music Volume 2

Guillaume de Machaut  The Complete Poetry and Music  Volume 2

In Fauvel Studies: Allegory, Chronicle, Music, and Image in Paris Bibliothèque Nationale de France, ... Yale French Studies 95 (1999), 193–211. ———. ... Poetry and Music in Medieval France: From Jean Renart to Guillaume de Machaut.

Author: Uri Smilansky

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781580443906

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 620

View: 898

This volume is the second of the thirteen in preparation that will offer the first complete scholarly edition of the poetry and music of Guillaume de Machaut, the foremost practitioner of these related arts at the end of the Middle Ages in France. It provides a freshly prepared edition based on the most reliable manuscript of two of Machaut's best known dits, the Remede de Fortune (Remedy for Fortune) and the Confort d'ami (Consolation from a Friend), both of which adapt the central ideas of Boethian philosophy to the love poetry tradition. The French texts are accompanied by facing English translations, and the musical passages are presented in situ in a performance-accessible form.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Blindness and Therapy in Late Medieval French and Italian Poetry

Blindness and Therapy in Late Medieval French and Italian Poetry

... ensured that the medicinal power of music became a topos of medieval discussion'.14 Therefore, while singing of love can deepen a poet's melancholy, it can also be a healing process: 'both ancient and medieval medicine prescribed ...

Author: Julie Singer

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 9781843842729

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 251

View: 100

An examination of the ways in which late medieval lyric poetry can be seen to engage with contemporary medical theory.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Medieval Author in Medieval French Literature

The Medieval Author in Medieval French Literature

(Barcelona: Quaderns Crema, 1988) 3: 385–394; Ardis Butterfield, Poetry and Music in Medieval France: From Jean Renart to Guillaume de Machaut (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002), ch 6; Tony Hunt, “'Monachus curialis'.

Author: V. Greene

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781403983459

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 257

View: 258

Thirty-five years ago Roland Barthes proclaimed the death of the Author. For medievalists no death has been more timely. The essays in this volume create a prism through which to understand medieval authorship as a process and the medieval author as an agency in the making.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Knowing Poetry

Knowing Poetry

Verse in Medieval France from the "Rose" to the "Rhétoriqueurs" Adrian Armstrong, Sarah Kay ... Woodbridge, Suffolk: D. S. Brewer, 1997. ——. Poetry and Music in Medieval France: From Jean Renart 218 Bibliography.

Author: Adrian Armstrong

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801461065

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 375

In the later Middle Ages, many writers claimed that prose is superior to verse as a vehicle of knowledge because it presents the truth in an unvarnished form, without the distortions of meter and rhyme. Beginning in the thirteenth century, works of verse narrative from the early Middle Ages were recast in prose, as if prose had become the literary norm. Instead of dying out, however, verse took on new vitality. In France verse texts were produced, in both French and Occitan, with the explicit intention of transmitting encyclopedic, political, philosophical, moral, historical, and other forms of knowledge. In Knowing Poetry, Adrian Armstrong and Sarah Kay explore why and how verse continued to be used to transmit and shape knowledge in France. They cover the period between Jean de Meun’s Roman de la rose (c. 1270) and the major work of Jean Bouchet, the last of the grands rhétoriqueurs (c. 1530). The authors find that the advent of prose led to a new relationship between poetry and knowledge in which poetry serves as a medium for serious reflection and self-reflection on subjectivity, embodiment, and time. They propose that three major works—the Roman de la rose, the Ovide moralisé, and Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy—form a single influential matrix linking poetry and intellectual inquiry, metaphysical insights, and eroticized knowledge. The trio of thought-world-contingency, poetically represented by Philosophy, Nature, and Fortune, grounds poetic exploration of reality, poetry, and community.
Categories: History

The Refrain and the Rise of the Vernacular in Medieval French Music and Poetry

The Refrain and the Rise of the Vernacular in Medieval French Music and Poetry

... innovations of the late medieval musical and poetic repertories of northern France, the refrain stands apart. The medieval refrain was a short, 1—2 verse lyric, sometimes provided with a specific melody through music notation.

Author: Jennifer Saltzstein

Publisher: DS Brewer

ISBN: 9781843843498

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 388

A survey of the use of the refrain in 13th and 14th century French music and poetry, showing how it was skillfully deployed to assert the validity of the vernacular.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Edinburgh Companion to Literature and Music

Edinburgh Companion to Literature and Music

Students of Stevens include Susan Rankin, The Music of the Medieval Liturgical Drama in France and England (New York and London: Garland, 1989); Ardis Butterfield, Poetry and Music in Medieval France from Jean Renart to Guillaume de ...

Author: Delia da Sousa Correa

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748693139

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 720

View: 247

Provides a pioneering interdisciplinary overview of the literature and music of nine centuriesOffers research essays by literary specialists and musicologists that provides access to the best current interdisciplinary scholarship on connections between literature and musicIncludes five historical sections from the Middle Ages to the present, with editorial introductions to enhance understanding of relationships between literature and music in each periodCharts and extends work in this expanding interdisciplinary field to provide an essential resource for researchers with an interest in literature and other mediaBringing together seventy-one newly commissioned original chapters by literary specialists and musicologists, this book presents the most recent interdisciplinary research into literature and music. In five parts, the chapters cover the Middle Ages to the present. The volume introduction and methodology chapters define key concepts for investigating the interdependence of these two art forms and a concluding chapter looks to the future of this interdisciplinary field. An editorial introduction to each historical part explains the main features of the relationships between literature and music in the period and outlines recent developments in scholarship. Contributions represent a multiplicity of approaches: theoretical, contextual and close reading. Case studies reach beyond literature and music to engage with related fields including philosophy, history of science, theatre, broadcast media and popular culture.This trailblazing companion charts and extends the work in this expanding interdisciplinary field and is an essential resource for researchers with an interest in literature and other media.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Courtly Love Songs of Medieval France

Courtly Love Songs of Medieval France

Switten, M. L., The Cansos of Raimon de Miraval: A Study of Poems and Melodies (Medieval Academy Books, 93; Cambridge, Mass., 1985). —— Music and Poetry in the Middle Ages: A Guide to Research on French and Occitan Song, 1100–1400 (New ...

Author: Mary J. O'Neill

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0198165471

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 877

Examines the legacy of the medieval poet composers of Northern France, the trouveres. For many years problems and difficulties concerning the surviving melodies, have prevented us from accessing these songs. This book addresses many of these problems, helping us develop an understanding of the repertoire.
Categories: History

The Cambridge Companion to French Music

The Cambridge Companion to French Music

John Leyerle (Kalamazoo, MI: Western Michigan University, 1993), 151–224. 42 For this and related sources, see Hiley, Western Plainchant, 39–42. 43 Haines, 'Anonymous IV', 384. 44 Ardis Butterfield, Poetry and Music in Medieval France: ...

Author: Simon Trezise

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521877947

Category: Music

Page: 441

View: 206

This accessible Companion provides a wide-ranging and comprehensive introduction to French music from the early middle ages to the present.
Categories: Music

Medieval Crossover

Medieval Crossover

Butterfield, Poetry and Music in Medieval France, 104. 60. Gautier de Coinci, Les Miracles de Nostre Dame, ed. V. Frédéric Koenig, 4 vols. (Geneva: Droz, 1955–1970); Gautier de Coinci: Miracles, Music, and Manuscripts, ed.

Author: Barbara Newman

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 9780268161408

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 608

The sacred and the secular in medieval literature have too often been perceived as opposites, or else relegated to separate but unequal spheres. In Medieval Crossover: Reading the Secular against the Sacred, Barbara Newman offers a new approach to the many ways that sacred and secular interact in medieval literature, arguing that (in contrast to our own cultural situation) the sacred was the normative, unmarked default category against which the secular always had to define itself and establish its niche. Newman refers to this dialectical relationship as "crossover"—which is not a genre in itself, but a mode of interaction, an openness to the meeting or even merger of sacred and secular in a wide variety of forms. Newman sketches a few of the principles that shape their interaction: the hermeneutics of "both/and," the principle of double judgment, the confluence of pagan material and Christian meaning in Arthurian romance, the rule of convergent idealism in hagiographic romance, and the double-edged sword in parody. Medieval Crossover explores a wealth of case studies in French, English, and Latin texts that concentrate on instances of paradox, collision, and convergence. Newman convincingly and with great clarity demonstrates the widespread applicability of the crossover concept as an analytical tool, examining some very disparate works. These include French and English romances about Lancelot and the Grail; the mystical writing of Marguerite Porete (placed in the context of lay spirituality, lyric traditions, and the Romance of the Rose); multiple examples of parody (sexually obscene, shockingly anti-Semitic, or cleverly litigious); and René of Anjou's two allegorical dream visions. Some of these texts are scarcely known to medievalists; others are rarely studied together. Newman's originality in her choice of these primary works will inspire new questions and set in motion new fields of exploration for medievalists working in a large variety of disciplines, including literature, religious studies, history, and cultural studies.
Categories: Religion