Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East

Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East

The Role of the Temple in Greece, Mesopotamia, and Israel Hector Avalos. B. A NEW APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF ILLNESS AND HEALTH CARE 1. General comments As Thomas Kuhn argued , advances in a field are rarely the products of new data.60 ...

Author: Hector Avalos

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004387607

Category: Medical

Page:

View: 878

Categories: Medical

Magic and Rationality in Ancient Near Eastern and Graeco Roman Medicine

Magic and Rationality in Ancient Near Eastern and Graeco Roman Medicine

(1995), Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East, Atlanta [= Harvard Semitic Museum Monographs 54; re-edition of Avalos 1991]. Biggs, R.D. (1969), 'Medicine in Ancient Mesopotamia', History of Science 8, 94–105.

Author: Manfred Horstmanshoff

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789047414315

Category: History

Page: 407

View: 766

A study of methods in Ancient Near Eastern and Greek and Roman medicine, based on representative text corpora. Central is the question of what is "rational", or not, in the various systems.
Categories: History

Ex Auditu Volume 21

Ex Auditu   Volume 21

the Middle Ages,” in ibid., 93–131; Hector Avalos, Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East: The Role of the Temple in Greece, Mesopotamia, and Israel (Atlanta: Scholars, 1995); Hector Avalos, Health Care and the Rise of ...

Author: Klyne Snodgrass

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498232609

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 571

Ps 103:3: "Bless the Lord . . . Who heals all your diseases."
Categories: Religion

Ancient Medicine

Ancient Medicine

Hector Avalos, Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East: The Role of the Temple in Greece, Mesopotamia and Israel (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1995), 134. 67. K. van der Toorn, Sin and Sanction in Israel and Mesopotamia (Maastrich: ...

Author: Laura M. Zucconi

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9781467457514

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 805

This book by Laura Zucconi is an accessible introductory text to the practice and theory of medicine in the ancient world. In contrast to other works that focus heavily on Greece and Rome, Zucconi’s Ancient Medicine covers a broader geographical and chronological range. The world of medicine in antiquity consisted of a lot more than Hippocrates and Galen. Zucconi applies historical and anthropological methods to examine the medical cultures of not only Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome but also the Levant, the Anatolian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau. Devoting special attention to the fundamental relationship between medicine and theology, Zucconi’s one-volume introduction brings the physicians, patients, procedures, medicines, and ideas of the past to light.
Categories: Medical

The Poor the Crippled the Blind and the Lame

 The Poor  the Crippled  the Blind  and the Lame

... proposes that like other ancient Near Eastern people groups, the home was the first locus of health care for the ancient Israelite ... However, in the case of mysterious ailments such as fevers, internal disorders, and severe pain, ...

Author: Louise A. Gosbell

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161551321

Category: Religion

Page: 427

View: 568

The New Testament gospels feature numerous social exchanges between Jesus and people with various physical and sensory disabilities. Despite this, traditional biblical scholarship has not seen these people as agents in their own right but existing only to highlight the actions of Jesus as a miracle worker. In this study, Louise A. Gosbell uses disability as a lens through which to explore a number of these passages anew. Using the cultural model of disability as the theoretical basis, she explores the way that the gospel writers, as with other writers of the ancient world, used the language of disability as a means of understanding, organising, and interpreting the experiences of humanity. Her investigation highlights the ways in which the gospel writers reinforce and reflect, as well as subvert, culturally-driven constructions of disability in the ancient world.
Categories: Religion

Disability and Christian Theology Embodied Limits and Constructive Possibilities

Disability and Christian Theology Embodied Limits and Constructive Possibilities

Avalos, Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East, 26. 14. Tan, “The Disabled Christ,” 8. 15. Brown, The Body and Society, 9. 16. Edwards, “Constructions of Physical Disability in the Ancient Greek World,” 36. 17.

Author: Deborah Beth Creamer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199887996

Category: Religion

Page: 168

View: 903

Attention to embodiment and the religious significance of bodies is one of the most significant shifts in contemporary theology. In the midst of this, however, experiences of disability have received little attention. This book explores possibilities for theological engagement with disability, focusing on three primary alternatives: challenging existing theological models to engage with the disabled body, considering possibilities for a disability liberation theology, and exploring new theological options based on an understanding of the unsurprisingness of human limits. The overarching perspective of this book is that limits are an unavoidable aspect of being human, a fact we often seem to forget or deny. Yet not only do all humans experience limits, most of us also experience limits that take the form of disability at some point in our lives; in this way, disability is more "normal" than non-disability. If we take such experiences seriously and refuse to reduce them to mere instances of suffering, we discover insights that are lost when we take a perfect or generic body as our starting point for theological reflections. While possible applications of this insight are vast, this work focuses on two areas of particular interest: theological anthropology and metaphors for God. This project challenges theology to consider the undeniable diversity of human embodiment. It also enriches previous disability work by providing an alternative to the dominant medical and minority models, both of which fail to acknowledge the full diversity of disability experiences. Most notably, this project offers new images and possibilities for theological construction that attend appropriately and creatively to diversity in human embodiment.
Categories: Religion

Biblical Corpora

Biblical Corpora

the Ancient Near East analyzed temples as parts of the health care systems.37 Employing the model of medical ... 38 The framework includes explanations of illness, possible remedies, and various consultants to whom a patient would go ...

Author: Rebecca Raphael

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780567279897

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 231

The book is organized by genre of biblical literature. First, the priestly literature articulates a binary concept of disability as impure and passive, i.e. as 'other' to the pure, holy, and active. By contrast, in the prophetic literature and the Psalms, images of disability structure communication among God, prophets, leaders, and people. Here, disability does not simply mean impurity; its valuation depends on its possessor. Wisdom literature and narrative present figures (e.g. Job, Mephibosheth) whose innate or acquired disabilities are nevertheless placed, and not simply as impurities, within cosmic and social order. Although priestly literature seems anomalous, all strata of biblical literature use disability imagery not primarily to represent disabled persons, but mainly to represent the power of Israel's God. Physical norms and disability thus play a pervasive and previously neglected role in biblical categories of holy/unholy, pure/impure, election/rejection, and God/idols. This book provides a literary critical method focused on representation in the canonical form of the text allows a comprehensive view of how images of disability operate in relation to major concepts, and also provides a foundation for studies in the history of interpretation. All discussion of biblical passages and books draw on existing historical studies as a necessary precondition for understanding.
Categories: Religion

Disability and Isaiah s Suffering Servant

Disability and Isaiah s Suffering Servant

See JoAnn Scurlock, MagicoMedical Means of Treating Ghost-Induced Illnesses in Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Magic and Divination 3 (Leiden: Brill, 2006), 77–81. Avalos, Illness and Health Care in the Ancient Near East, 332.

Author: Jeremy Schipper

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191619830

Category: Religion

Page: 184

View: 951

Although disability imagery is ubiquitous in the Hebrew Bible, characters with disabilities are not. The presence of the former does not guarantee the presence of the later. While interpreters explain away disabilities in specific characters, they celebrate the rhetorical contributions that disability imagery makes to the literary artistry of biblical prose and poetry, often as a trope to describe the suffering or struggles of a presumably nondisabled person or community. This situation contributes to the appearance (or illusion) of a Hebrew Bible that uses disability as a rich literary trope while disavowing the presence of figures or characters with disabilities. Isaiah 53 provides a wonderful example of this dynamic at work. The "Suffering Servant" figure in Isaiah 53 has captured the imagination of readers since very early in the history of biblical interpretation. Most interpreters understand the servant as an otherwise able bodied person who suffers. By contrast, Jeremy Schipper's study shows that Isaiah 53 describes the servant with language and imagery typically associated with disability in the Hebrew Bible and other ancient Near Eastern literature. Informed by recent work in disability studies from across the humanities, it traces both the disappearance of the servant's disability from the interpretative history of Isaiah 53 and the scholarly creation of the able bodied suffering servant.
Categories: Religion