Environmental Infrastructure in African History Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia

Environmental Infrastructure in African History  Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia

"Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia Environmental Infrastructure in African History offers a new approach for analyzing and narrating environmental change.

Author: Emmanuel Kreike

Publisher:

ISBN: 1107336333

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 453

"Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia Environmental Infrastructure in African History offers a new approach for analyzing and narrating environmental change. Environmental change conventionally is understood as occurring in a linear fashion, moving from a state of more nature to a state of less nature and more culture. In this model, non-Western and premodern societies live off natural resources, whereas more modern societies rely on artifact, or nature that is transformed and domesticated through science and technology into culture. In contrast, Emmanuel Kreike argues that both non-Western and premodern societies inhabit a dynamic middle ground between nature and culture. He asserts that humans- in collaboration with plants, animals, and other animate and inanimate forces - create environmental infrastructure that constantly is remade and reimagined in the face of ongoing processes of change"--
Categories: History

Environmental Infrastructure in African History

Environmental Infrastructure in African History

... 1850-1980 Robert Harms Games Against Nature: An Eco—Cultural History of the Nunu of Equatorial Africa Warren Dean Brazil and the Struggle for Rubber: A Study in Environmental History Samuel P. Hays Beauty, Health, and Permanence: ...

Author: Emmanuel Kreike

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107328235

Category: Nature

Page:

View: 751

Environmental Infrastructure in African History offers a new approach for analyzing and narrating environmental change. Environmental change conventionally is understood as occurring in a linear fashion, moving from a state of more nature to a state of less nature and more culture. In this model, non-Western and pre-modern societies live off natural resources, whereas more modern societies rely on artifact, or nature that is transformed and domesticated through science and technology into culture. In contrast, Emmanuel Kreike argues that both non-Western and pre-modern societies inhabit a dynamic middle ground between nature and culture. He asserts that humans - in collaboration with plants, animals, and other animate and inanimate forces - create environmental infrastructure that constantly is remade and re-imagined in the face of ongoing processes of change.
Categories: Nature

African Environmental Crisis

African Environmental Crisis

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 Kreike, Environmental infrastructure in African history; Ford, John, The role of the trypanosomiases in African ecology: A study of the tsetse fly problem (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971).

Author: Gufu Oba

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000055894

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 861

This book explores how and why the idea of the African environmental crisis developed and persisted through colonial and post-colonial periods, and why it has been so influential in development discourse. From the beginnings of imperial administration, the idea of the desiccation of African environments grew in popularity, but this crisis discourse was dominated by the imposition of imperial scientific knowledge, neglecting indigenous knowledge and experience. African Environmental Crisis provides a synthesis of more than one-and-a-half century’s research on peasant agriculture and pastoral rangeland development in terms of soil erosion control, animal husbandry, grazing schemes, large-scale agricultural schemes, social and administrative science research, and vector-disease and pest controls. Drawing on comparative socio-ecological perspectives of African peoples across the East African colonies and post-independent states, this book refutes the hypothesis that African peoples were responsible for environmental degradation. Instead, Gufu Oba argues that flawed imperial assumptions and short-term research projects generated an inaccurate view of the environment in Africa. This book’s discussion of the history of science for development provides researchers across environmental studies, agronomy, African history and development studies with a lens through which to understand the underlying assumptions behind development projects in Africa.
Categories: Social Science

Scorched Earth

Scorched Earth

... Environmental Infrastructure in African History: Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013). 4. Kreike, Re- Creating Eden, 15–55; Kreike, Environmental Infrastructure.

Author: Emmanuel Kreike

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691200125

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 800

A global history of environmental warfare and the case for why it should be a crime The environmental infrastructure that sustains human societies has been a target and instrument of war for centuries, resulting in famine and disease, displaced populations, and the devastation of people’s livelihoods and ways of life. Scorched Earth traces the history of scorched earth, military inundations, and armies living off the land from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, arguing that the resulting deliberate destruction of the environment—"environcide"—constitutes total war and is a crime against humanity and nature. In this sweeping global history, Emmanuel Kreike shows how religious war in Europe transformed Holland into a desolate swamp where hunger and the black death ruled. He describes how Spanish conquistadores exploited the irrigation works and expansive agricultural terraces of the Aztecs and Incas, triggering a humanitarian crisis of catastrophic proportions. Kreike demonstrates how environmental warfare has continued unabated into the modern era. His panoramic narrative takes readers from the Thirty Years' War to the wars of France's Sun King, and from the Dutch colonial wars in North America and Indonesia to the early twentieth century colonial conquest of southwestern Africa. Shedding light on the premodern origins and the lasting consequences of total war, Scorched Earth explains why ecocide and genocide are not separate phenomena, and why international law must recognize environmental warfare as a violation of human rights.
Categories: History

Environment Modernization and Development in East Asia

Environment  Modernization and Development in East Asia

Perspectives from Environmental History Ts'ui-jung Liu, James Beattie ... These ideas are refined and elaborated in Emmanuel Kreike, Environmental Infrastructure in African History: Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in ...

Author: Ts'ui-jung Liu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137572318

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 203

Environment, Modernization and Development in East Asia critically examines modernization's long-term environmental history. It suggests new frameworks for understanding as inter-related processes environmental, social, and economic change across China and Japan.
Categories: History

The Politics of Nature and Science in Southern Africa

The Politics of Nature and Science in Southern Africa

African Environment and Development: Rhetoric, Programme and Reality. Aldershot: Ashgate: 89–110. Kreike, E. (2013), Environmental Infrastructure in African History, Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia.

Author: Maano Ramutsindela

Publisher: African Books Collective

ISBN: 9783905758870

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 661

This book brings together recent and ongoing empirical studies to examine two relational kinds of politics, namely, the politics of nature, i.e. how nature conservation projects are sites on which power relations play out, and the politics of the scientific study of nature. These are discussed in their historical and present contexts, and at specific sites on which particular human-environment relations are forged or contested. This spatio-temporal juxtaposition is lacking in current research on political ecology while the politics of science appears marginal to critical scholarship on social nature. Specifically, the book examines power relations in nature-related activities, demonstrates conditions under which nature and science are politicised, and also accounts for political interests and struggles over nature in its various forms. The ecological, socio-political and economic dimensions of nature cannot be ignored when dealing with present-day environmental issues. Nature conservation regulations are concerned with the management of flora and fauna as much as with humans. Various chapters in the book pay attention to the ways in which nature, science and politics are interrelated and also co-constitutive of each other. They highlight that power relations are naturalised through science and science-related institutions and projects such as museums, botanical gardens, wetlands, parks and nature reserves.
Categories: Political Science

Environing Empire

Environing Empire

Jahrhundert (Basel, 2011); Kreike, Environmental Infrastructure in African History. 44. Judith Carney and Haripriya Rangan, “Situating African Agency in Environmental History,” History and Environment 21, no. 1 (2015): 1–11, here 7. 45.

Author: Martin Kalb

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781800734579

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 531

Even leaving aside the vast death and suffering that it wrought on indigenous populations, German ambitions to transform Southwest Africa in the early part of the twentieth century were futile for most. For years colonists wrestled ocean waters, desert landscapes, and widespread aridity as they tried to reach inland in their effort of turning outwardly barren lands into a profitable settler colony. In his innovative environmental history, Martin Kalb outlines the development of the colony up to World War I, deconstructing the common settler narrative, all to reveal the importance of natural forces and the Kaisereich’s everyday violence.
Categories: History

Environment and Society in the Long Late Antiquity

Environment and Society in the Long Late Antiquity

(2014) “The climate and environment of Byzantine Anatolia: integrating science, history and archaeology”, ... Kreike E. (2013) Environmental Infrastructure in African History: Examining the Myth of Natural Resource Management in Namibia ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004392083

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 657

Environment and Society in the Long Late Antiquity brings together scientific, archaeological and historical evidence on the interplay of social change and environmental phenomena at the end of Antiquity and the dawn of the Middle Ages, ca. 300-800 AD.
Categories: History

Landscape as Infrastructure

Landscape as Infrastructure

Here, the confluence of the “landscape and infrastructure” parallels that of “environment and infrastructure,” as profiled in Emmanuel Kreike's Environmental Infrastructure in African History (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, ...

Author: Pierre Belanger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317243175

Category: Architecture

Page: 508

View: 911

As ecology becomes the new engineering, the projection of landscape as infrastructure—the contemporary alignment of the disciplines of landscape architecture, civil engineering, and urban planning— has become pressing. Predominant challenges facing urban regions and territories today—including shifting climates, material flows, and population mobilities, are addressed and strategized here. Responding to the under-performance of master planning and over-exertion of technological systems at the end of twentieth century, this book argues for the strategic design of "infrastructural ecologies," describing a synthetic landscape of living, biophysical systems that operate as urban infrastructures to shape and direct the future of urban economies and cultures into the 21st century. Pierre Bélanger is Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture and Co-Director of the Master in Design Studies Program at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. As part of the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Advansed Studies Program, Bélanger teaches and coordinates graduate courses on the convergence of ecology, infrastructure and urbanism in the interrelated fields of design, planning and engineering. Dr. Bélanger is author of the 35th edition of the Pamphlet Architecture Series from Princeton Architectural Press, GOING LIVE: from States to Systems (pa35.net), co-editor with Jennifer Sigler of the 39th issue of Harvard Design Magazine, Wet Matter, and co-author of the forthcoming volume ECOLOGIES OF POWER: Mapping Military Geographies & Logistical Landscapes of the U.S. Department of Defense. As a landscape architect and urbanist, he is the recipient of the 2008 Canada Prix de Rome in Architecture and the Curator for the Canada Pavilion ad Canadian Exhibition, "EXTRACTION," at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale (extraction.ca).
Categories: Architecture

Cities in a Sunburnt Country

Cities in a Sunburnt Country

Environment. and. History. Other Books in the Series (continued): John L. Brooke, Climate Change and the Course of ... An Environmental History of Russia Emmanuel Kreike, Environmental Infrastructure in African History: Examining the ...

Author: Margaret Cook

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108917117

Category: Nature

Page:

View: 540

As Australian cities face uncertain water futures, what insights can the history of Aboriginal and settler relationships with water yield? Residents have come to expect reliable, safe, and cheap water, but natural limits and the costs of maintaining and expanding water networks are at odds with forms and cultures of urban water use. Cities in a Sunburnt Country is the first comparative study of the provision, use, and social impact of water and water infrastructure in Australia's five largest cities. Drawing on environmental, urban, and economic history, this co-authored book challenges widely held assumptions, both in Australia and around the world, about water management, consumption, and sustainability. From the 'living water' of Aboriginal cultures to the rise of networked water infrastructure, the book invites us to take a long view of how water has shaped our cities, and how urban water systems and cultures might weather a warming world.
Categories: Nature