Cold War in Psychiatry

Cold War in Psychiatry

Cold War in Psychiatry tells the full story for the first time and from inside, among others on basis of extensive reports by Stasi and KGB - who were the secret actors, what were the hidden factors?Based on a wealth of new evidence and ...

Author: Robert van Voren

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1058096984

Category: Cold War

Page:

View: 182

For 20 years Soviet psychiatric abuse dominated the agenda of the World Psychiatric Association. It ended only after the Soviet Foreign Ministry intervened. Cold War in Psychiatry tells the full story for the first time and from inside, among others on basis of extensive reports by Stasi and KGB - who were the secret actors, what were the hidden factors?Based on a wealth of new evidence and documentation as well as interviews with many of the main actors, including leading Western psychiatrists, Soviet dissidents and Soviet and East German key figures, the book describes the issue in all its complexity and puts it in a broader context. In the book opposite sides find common ground and a common understanding of what actually happened.
Categories: Cold War

Cold War in Psychiatry

Cold War in Psychiatry

Author: Robert Van Voren

Publisher:

ISBN: 9986310709

Category: Political prisoners

Page: 135

View: 168

Categories: Political prisoners

Non Aligned Psychiatry in the Cold War

Non Aligned Psychiatry in the Cold War

This book explores the relationship between socialist psychiatry and political ideology during the Cold War.

Author: Ana Antić

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030894498

Category: Cold War

Page: 333

View: 320

This book explores the relationship between socialist psychiatry and political ideology during the Cold War. In the context of Yugoslavias traumatic split from the Soviet Union in 1948, the authorities embarked on a period of theorising and constructing a different form of socialist society, and clinicians and researchers from the psy disciplines saw their role as central to raising a new, revolutionary generation of Yugoslav citizens. This study argues that socialist psychiatry and psychoanalysis in Yugoslavia played an exceptionally important political role and contributed to some of the core discussions of democratic socialism, workers self-management and Marxism. It argues that the Yugoslav brand of East-West psychoanalysis and psychotherapy bred a truly unique intellectual framework in order to think through a set of political and ideological dilemmas regarding the relationship between individuals and social structures. The book therefore offers a thorough reinterpretation of the notion of communist psychiatry as a tool used solely for political oppression and emphasises instead the original political interventions of East European psychiatry and psychoanalysis.
Categories: Cold War

In the Labyrinth of the KGB

In the Labyrinth of the KGB

67. van Voren, Cold War in Psychiatry, 106. See also his micro-lecture for Volyn Media, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjt8jQ-qies (accessed 12 September 2020). 68. van Voren, Cold War in Psychiatry, 414. 69.

Author: Olga Bertelsen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781793608932

Category: History

Page: 371

View: 245

This book focuses on the writers who lived through the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization during the 1960s and 1970s in Soviet Ukraine. The author argues that the KGB unintentionally facilitated the transnational and intercultural links among the Kharkiv multiethnic community of writers.
Categories: History

Therapeutic Revolutions

Therapeutic Revolutions

Beginning with a discussion of the profound impact of World War II and the Cold War on mental health, Halliwell moves from the influence of work, family, and growing up in the Eisenhower years to the critique of institutional practice and ...

Author: Martin Halliwell

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813560663

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 180

Therapeutic Revolutions examines the evolving relationship between American medicine, psychiatry, and culture from World War II to the dawn of the 1970s. In this richly layered intellectual history, Martin Halliwell ranges from national politics, public reports, and healthcare debates to the ways in which film, literature, and the mass media provided cultural channels for shaping and challenging preconceptions about health and illness. Beginning with a discussion of the profound impact of World War II and the Cold War on mental health, Halliwell moves from the influence of work, family, and growing up in the Eisenhower years to the critique of institutional practice and the search for alternative therapeutic communities during the 1960s. Blending a discussion of such influential postwar thinkers as Erich Fromm, William Menninger, Erving Goffman, Erik Erikson, and Herbert Marcuse with perceptive readings of a range of cultural text that illuminate mental health issues--among them Spellbound, Shock Corridor, Revolutionary Road, and I Never Promised You a Rose Garden--this compelling study argues that the postwar therapeutic revolutions closely interlink contrasting discourses of authority and liberation.
Categories: Medical

Law and Psychiatry

Law and Psychiatry

Author: Sheldon Glueck

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3966846

Category: Insanity

Page: 200

View: 382

Categories: Insanity

Madness in Cold War America

Madness in Cold War America

Szasz's importance for understanding Cold War madness lies in his function as an essential link between postwar psychiatry, alternative or countercultural therapies, and the neoliberal mental health system that emerged out of the ...

Author: Alexander Dunst

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317360803

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 558

This book tells the story of how madness came to play a prominent part in America’s political and cultural debates. It argues that metaphors of madness rise to unprecedented popularity amidst the domestic struggles of the early Cold War and become a pre-eminent way of understanding the relationship between politics and culture in the United States. In linking the individual psyche to society, psychopathology contributes to issues central to post-World War II society: a dramatic extension of state power, the fate of the individual in bureaucratic society, the political function of emotions, and the limits to admissible dissent. Such vocabulary may accuse opponents of being crazy. Yet at stake is a fundamental error of judgment, for which madness provides welcome metaphors across US diplomacy and psychiatry, social movements and criticism, literature and film. In the process, major parties and whole historical eras, literary movements and social groups are declared insane. Reacting against violence at home and war abroad, countercultural authors oppose a sane madness to irrational reason—romanticizing the wisdom of the schizophrenic and paranoia’s superior insight. As the Sixties give way to a plurality of lifestyles an alternative vision arrives: of a madness now become so widespread and ordinary that it may, finally, escape pathology.
Categories: History

British Human Rights Organizations and Soviet Dissent 1965 1985

British Human Rights Organizations and Soviet Dissent  1965 1985

News Bulletin on Psychiatric Abuse in the Soviet Union, No. 3, p. 14. (November 2010), 'Soviets left WPA under expulsion threat', Psychiatric News, Vol. 45, No. 22, p. 11. See Van Voren, R. (2010), Cold War in Psychiatry: Human Factors, ...

Author: Mark Hurst

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472522344

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 274

In the latter half of the 20th century, a number of dissidents engaged in a series of campaigns against the Soviet authorities and as a result were subjected to an array of cruel and violent punishments. A collection of like-minded activists in Britain campaigned on their behalf, and formed a variety of organizations to publicise their plight. British Human Rights Organizations and Soviet Dissent, 1965-1985 examines the efforts of these activists, exploring how influential their activism was in shaping the wider public awareness of Soviet human rights violations in the context of the Cold War. Mark Hurst explores the British response to Soviet human rights violation, drawing on extensive archival work and interviews with key individuals from the period. This book examines the network of human rights activists in Britain, and demonstrates that in order to be fully understood, the Soviet dissident movement needs to be considered in an international context.
Categories: History

Mental Health and Human Rights

Mental Health and Human Rights

61 The Soviet lesson Looking back, the issue of Soviet political abuse of psychiatry had a lasting impact on world ... Their work was, whether they wanted or not, an element in the Cold War between East and West, and also in their case ...

Author: Michael Dudley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191629013

Category: Medical

Page:

View: 627

Mental disorders are ubiquitous, profoundly disabling and people suffering from them frequently endure the worst conditions of life. In recent decades both mental health and human rights have emerged as areas of practice, inquiry, national policy-making and shared international concern. Human-rights monitoring and reporting are core features of public administration in most countries, and human rights law has burgeoned. Mental health also enjoys a new dignity in scholarship, international discussions and programs, mass-media coverage and political debate. Today's experts insist that it impacts on every aspect of health and human well-being, and so becomes essential to achieving human rights. It is remarkable however that the struggle for human rights over the past two centuries largely bypassed the plight of those with mental disabilities. Mental health is frequently absent from routine health and social policy-making and research, and from many global health initiatives, for example, the Millenium Development Goals. Yet the impact of mental disorder is profound, not least when combined with poverty, mass trauma and social disruption, as in many poorer countries. Stigma is widespread and mental disorders frequently go unnoticed and untreated. Even in settings where mental health has attracted attention and services have undergone reform, resources are typically scarce, inequitably distributed, and inefficiently deployed. Social inclusion of those with psychosocial disabilities languishes as a distant ideal. In practice, therefore, the international community still tends to prioritise human rights while largely ignoring mental health, which remains in the shadow of physical-health programs. Yet not only do persons with mental disorders suffer deprivations of human rights but violations of human rights are now recognized as a major cause of mental disorder - a pattern that indicates how inextricably linked are the two domains. This volume offers the first attempt at a comprehensive survey of the key aspects of this interrelationship. It examines the crucial relationships and histories of mental health and human rights, and their interconnections with law, culture, ethnicity, class, economics, neuro-biology, and stigma. It investigates the responsibilities of states in securing the rights of those with mental disabilities, the predicaments of vulnerable groups, and the challenge of promoting and protecting mental health. In this wide-ranging analysis, many themes recur - for example, the enormous mental health burdens caused by war and social conflicts; the need to include mental-health interventions in humanitarian programs in a manner that does not undermine traditional healing and recovery processes of indigenous peoples; and the imperative to reduce gender-based violence and inequities. It particularly focuses on the first-person narratives of mental-health consumers, their families and carers, the collective voices that invite a major shift in vision and praxis. The book will be valuable for mental-health and helping professionals, lawyers, philosophers, human-rights workers and their organisations, the UN and other international agencies, social scientists, representatives of government, teachers, religious professionals, researchers, and policy-makers.
Categories: Medical

The Making of the Cold War Enemy

The Making of the Cold War Enemy

Joost Meerloo, The Rape of the Mind: The Psychology of Thought Control, Menticide, and Brainwashing (Cleveland, 1956), 49. 19. ... “The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and the Cold War Brainwashing Scare,” Historical Journal of Film, Radio, ...

Author: Ron Theodore Robin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400830305

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 240

At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. government enlisted the aid of a select group of psychologists, sociologists, and political scientists to blueprint enemy behavior. Not only did these academics bring sophisticated concepts to what became a project of demonizing communist societies, but they influenced decision-making in the map rooms, prison camps, and battlefields of the Korean War and in Vietnam. With verve and insight, Ron Robin tells the intriguing story of the rise of behavioral scientists in government and how their potentially dangerous, "American" assumptions about human behavior would shape U.S. views of domestic disturbances and insurgencies in Third World countries for decades to come. Based at government-funded think tanks, the experts devised provocative solutions for key Cold War dilemmas, including psychological warfare projects, negotiation strategies during the Korean armistice, and morale studies in the Vietnam era. Robin examines factors that shaped the scientists' thinking and explores their psycho-cultural and rational choice explanations for enemy behavior. He reveals how the academics' intolerance for complexity ultimately reduced the nation's adversaries to borderline psychotics, ignored revolutionary social shifts in post-World War II Asia, and promoted the notion of a maniacal threat facing the United States. Putting the issue of scientific validity aside, Robin presents the first extensive analysis of the intellectual underpinnings of Cold War behavioral sciences in a book that will be indispensable reading for anyone interested in the era and its legacy.
Categories: History