Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture

Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture

The collection of essays in this volume, Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture does not ignore the theoretical fray, but its objective is on relationships between animals and children thereby tendering to ongoing debates in ...

Author: Brenda Ayres

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000760125

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 218

Whether a secularized morality, biblical worldview, or unstated set of mores, the Victorian period can and always will be distinguished from those before and after for its pervasive sense of the "proper way" of thinking, speaking, doing, and acting. Animals in literature taught Victorian children how to be behave. If you are a postmodern posthumanist, you might argue, "But the animals in literature did not write their own accounts." Animal characters may be the creations of writers’ imagination, but animals did and do exist in their own right, as did and do humans. The original essays in Animals and Their Children in Victorian explore the representation of animals in children’s literature by resisting an anthropomorphized perception of them. Instead of focusing on the domestication of animals, this book analyzes how animals in literature "civilize" children, teaching them how to get along with fellow creatures—both human and nonhuman.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Pets and Domesticity in Victorian Literature and Culture

Pets and Domesticity in Victorian Literature and Culture

Animality, Queer Relations, and the Victorian Family Monica Flegel ... Furthermore, as discourses on cruelty within publications like the RSPCA's Animal World revealed, children and animals alike experienced the extent to which a state ...

Author: Monica Flegel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317564850

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 548

Addressing the significance of the pet in the Victorian period, this book examines the role played by the domestic pet in delineating relations for each member of the "natural" family home. Flegel explores the pet in relation to the couple at the head of the house, to the children who make up the family’s dependents, and to the common familial "outcasts" who populate Victorian literature and culture: the orphan, the spinster, the bachelor, and the same-sex couple. Drawing upon both animal studies and queer theory, this study stresses the importance of the domestic pet in elucidating normative sexuality and (re)productivity within the familial home, and reveals how the family pet operates as a means of identifying aberrant, failed, or perverse familial and gender performances. The family pet, that is, was an important signifier in Victorian familial ideology of the individual family unit’s ability to support or threaten the health and morality of the nation in the Victorian period. Texts by authors such as Clara Balfour, Juliana Horatia Ewing, E. Burrows, Bessie Rayner Parkes, Anne Brontë, George Eliot, Frederick Marryat, and Charles Dickens speak to the centrality of the domestic pet to negotiations of gender, power, and sexuality within the home that both reify and challenge the imaginary structure known as the natural family in the Victorian period. This book highlights the possibilities for a familial elsewhere outside of normative and restrictive models of heterosexuality, reproduction, and the natural family, and will be of interest to those studying Victorian literature and culture, animal studies, queer studies, and beyond.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Theological Dickens

The Theological Dickens

She published two other books by Routledge: Victorians and Their Animals: Beast on a Leash (2019) and Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture (2020). Sarah E. Maier is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the ...

Author: Brenda Ayres

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000469387

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 439

This is the first collection to investigate Charles Dickens on his vast and various opinions about the uses and abuses of the tenets of Christian faith that imbue English Victorian culture. Although previous studies have looked at his well-known antipathies toward Dissenters, Evangelicals, Catholics, and Jews, they have also disagreed about Dickens’ thoughts on Unitarianism and speculated on doctrines of Protestantism that he endorsed or rejected. Besides addressing his depiction of these religious groups, the volume’s contributors locate gaps in scholarship and unresolved illations about poverty and charity, representations of children, graveyards, labor, scientific controversy, and other social issues through an investigation of Dickens’ theological concerns. In addition, given that Dickens’ texts continue to influence every generation around the globe, a timely inclusion in the collection is a consideration of the neo-Victorian multi-media representations of Dickens’ work and his ideas on theological questions pitched to a postmodern society.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Victorian Animal Dreams

Victorian Animal Dreams

Representations of Animals in Victorian Literature and Culture Deborah Denenholz Morse, Martin A. Danahay ... Brown describes the children's dog in terms that give him a class consciousness: The dog which accompanies them is evidently ...

Author: Deborah Denenholz Morse

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351875950

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 322

View: 551

The Victorian period witnessed the beginning of a debate on the status of animals that continues today. This volume explicitly acknowledges the way twenty-first-century deliberations about animal rights and the fact of past and prospective animal extinction haunt the discussion of the Victorians' obsession with animals. Combining close attention to historical detail with a sophisticated analytical framework, the contributors examine the various forms of human dominion over animals, including imaginative possession of animals in the realms of fiction, performance, and the visual arts, as well as physical control as manifest in hunting, killing, vivisection and zookeeping. The diverse range of topics, analyzed from a contemporary perspective, makes the volume a significant contribution to Victorian studies. The conclusion by Harriet Ritvo, the pre-eminent authority in the field of Victorian/animal studies, provides valuable insight into the burgeoning field of animal studies and points toward future studies of animals in the Victorian period.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Animals Museum Culture and Children s Literature in Nineteenth Century Britain

Animals  Museum Culture and Children   s Literature in Nineteenth Century Britain

The study of the appropriation of animals in early children's literature is pursued in Chap. 3, which focuses on representations of Victorian menageries. The first decades of the nineteenth century were, indeed, marked by the founding ...

Author: Laurence Talairach

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030725273

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 309

View: 620

Animals, Museum Culture and Children’s Literature in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Curious Beasties explores the relationship between the zoological and palaeontological specimens brought back from around the world in the long nineteenth century—be they alive, stuffed or fossilised—and the development of children’s literature at this time. Children’s literature emerged as dizzying numbers of new species flooded into Britain with scientific expeditions, from giraffes and hippopotami to kangaroos, wombats, platypuses or sloths. As the book argues, late Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian children’s writers took part in the urge for mass education and presented the world and its curious creatures to children, often borrowing from their museum culture and its objects to map out that world. This original exploration illuminates how children’s literature dealt with the new ordering of the world, offering a unique viewpoint on the construction of science in the long nineteenth century.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Ghost Android Animal

Ghost  Android  Animal

Series Editor: Karen Raber, University of Mississippi, USA Literary and cultural criticism has ventured into a brave new ... Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture Brenda Ayres and Sarah Elizabeth Maier Ghost, Android, Animal ...

Author: Tony M. Vinci

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000760569

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 462

Ghost, Android, Animal challenges the notion that trauma literature functions as a healing agent for victims of severe pain and loss by bringing trauma studies into the orbit of posthumanist thought. Investigating how literary representations of ghosts, androids, and animals engage traumatic experience, this book revisits canonical texts by William Faulkner and Toni Morrison and aligns them with experimental and popular texts by Shirley Jackson, Philip K. Dick, and Clive Barker. In establishing this textual field, the book reveals how depictions of non-human agents invite readers to cross subjective and cultural thresholds and interact with the "impossible" pain of others. Ultimately, this study asks us to consider new practices for reading trauma literature that enlarges our conceptions of the human and the real.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Fairy Tales Natural History and Victorian Culture

Fairy Tales  Natural History and Victorian Culture

For Jessica Straley, the influence of recapitulation theory on Victorian child psychology and on pedagogical programmes intended for Victorian children explains the stress on the child's proximity to animals and his evolution from beast ...

Author: Laurence Talairach-Vielmas

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137342409

Category: Fiction

Page: 217

View: 362

Fairy Tales, Natural History and Victorian Culture examines how literary fairy tales were informed by natural historical knowledge in the Victorian period, as well as how popular science books used fairies to explain natural history at a time when 'nature' became a much debated word.
Categories: Fiction

Neo Victorian Madness

Neo Victorian Madness

Marshall Needleman Armintor is Principal Lecturer in English at the University of North Texas. ... Allusions from the Past (2020); Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture (2019) and Reinventing Marie Corelli for the Twenty-First ...

Author: Sarah E. Maier

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030465827

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 731

Neo-Victorian Madness: Rediagnosing Nineteenth-Century Mental Illness in Literature and Other Media investigates contemporary fiction, cinema and television shows set in the Victorian period that depict mad murderers, lunatic doctors, social dis/ease and madhouses as if many Victorians were “mad.” Such portraits demand a “rediagnosing” of mental illness that was often reduced to only female hysteria or a general malaise in nineteenth-century renditions. This collection of essays explores questions of neo-Victorian representations of moral insanity, mental illness, disturbed psyches or non-normative imaginings as well as considers the important issues of legal righteousness, social responsibility or methods of restraint and corrupt incarcerations. The chapters investigate the self-conscious re-visions, legacies and lessons of nineteenth-century discourses of madness and/or those persons presumed mad rediagnosed by present-day (neo-Victorian) representations informed by post-nineteenth-century psychological insights.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Animals in Victorian Literature and Culture

Animals in Victorian Literature and Culture

As several of our contributors argue, what might be termed the “rhetoric of animals” in Victorian culture often covers ... examples of animal autobiographies are designated (often erroneously in our view) as children's literature, ...

Author: Laurence W. Mazzeno

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137602190

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 289

View: 770

This collection includes twelve provocative essays from a diverse group of international scholars, who utilize a range of interdisciplinary approaches to analyze “real” and “representational” animals that stand out as culturally significant to Victorian literature and culture. Essays focus on a wide range of canonical and non-canonical Victorian writers, including Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, Anna Sewell, Emily Bronte, James Thomson, Christina Rossetti, and Richard Marsh, and they focus on a diverse array of forms: fiction, poetry, journalism, and letters. These essays consider a wide range of cultural attitudes and literary treatments of animals in the Victorian Age, including the development of the animal protection movement, the importation of animals from the expanding Empire, the acclimatization of British animals in other countries, and the problems associated with increasing pet ownership. The collection also includes an Introduction co-written by the editors and Suggestions for Further Study, and will prove of interest to scholars and students across the multiple disciplines which comprise Animal Studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Gothic Mash Ups

Gothic Mash Ups

of Neo-Victorian Studies (2020) and Neo-Victorian Madness: Rediagnosing Nineteenth-Century Mental Illness in Literature ... Neo-Gothic Narratives: Illusory Allusions from the Past (2020); Animals and Their Children in Victorian Culture ...

Author: Natalie Neill

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781793636584

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 285

View: 884

Through an examination of texts from diverse periods and media, Gothic Mash-Ups explores the role that appropriation and intertextuality play in Gothic storytelling. Building on recent scholarship on Gothic remix and adaptation, the contributors demonstrate that the Gothic is a fundamentally hybrid genre.
Categories: Literary Criticism