Alternative Nuclear Futures

Alternative Nuclear Futures

Contributing to the topical debate about the future of nuclear weapons, this book highlights the role of nuclear weapons in world politics in the post-cold war era.

Author: Professor and Dean of Economics and Social Studies John Baylis

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019829624X

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 651

A major debate has emerged in recent years, which centres on the future role of nuclear weapons in world politics. Focusing attention to the role of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war world, the book argues that unlike the debates which emerged during the cold war period, the contemporarydebate has taken place largely in private, with only limited involvement by the general public. What is also significant is the traditional 'left-wing' versus Establishment divide has also largely disappeared. Furthermore, a growing number of senior military and defence officials and governmentsallied with the United States, openly advocate the abolition of nuclear weapons. One of the features of the post-cold war debate is that statesman and scholars alike have begun to think the unthinkable-to consider the possibility of reducing the size of nuclear arsenals, and eventually forabolishing them completely. Contributions from leading academics highlight the key themes that have emerged in this debate. The book aims to generate a wider debate about a subject which, despite the changes that have taken place over the last two decades, continues to be of supreme importance.
Categories: History

Nuclear Designs

Nuclear Designs

Larkin argues that if they chose the status quo, they elect a world in which only terror and self-restraint keep devastation at bay, a world in which instant destruction is possible.

Author: Bruce Larkin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138512664

Category: Nuclear arms control

Page: 354

View: 385

Global politics has changed with unaccustomed swiftness since the end of the Cold War. Eastern Europe is free; the Soviet Union has broken up; China presses free market economic reform; and the United States and Russia have declared a joint commitment to end nuclear war. The force of these changes has created a new agenda for global politics and security policy. This does not mean that nuclear weapons have lost their centrality. Nuclear development programs continue in the major holders of advanced weapons. In Israel, Pakistan, India, North Korea, Iraq, and Iran nuclear intentions are subject to widespread speculation and scrutiny. Negotiations for renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty remind us that the treaty requires serious efforts to abolish nuclear weapons. Nuclear Choices points out that the Cold War's end has not banished mistrust. Instead, it has opened the door to frank conversation about the usefulness of force and the need to address common fears. States now face a global choice among alternative nuclear futures. If they desire to avoid runaway nuclear development, the choices come down to three: the status quo, disengagement, or abolition. Larkin argues that if they chose the status quo, they elect a world in which only terror and self-restraint keep devastation at bay, a world in which instant destruction is possible. This study focuses on the nuclear weapons programs of Great Britain, China, and France, because they may be less familiar to students of international affairs. Each of these countries has developed a substantial nuclear capability that could decisively shape the result of coming global nuclear decisions. Larkin concludes that these three minipowers could conclude that nuclearism serves their interests, refuse disengagement, and encourage proliferation. If they are prepared to abandon nuclearism, they have tremendous political leverage on Russia, the United States, and also on undeclared and aspiring nuclear weapons states. For now, only the United Kingdom, France, and China maintain sufficient warhead inventories and production capabilities to have strong effects on how the United States and Russia view their own strategic capabilities. Nuclear Choices asserts that governments, polities, and parties today do not know how to guarantee themselves against weapons of mass destruction. They must either acquire the political and social means to achieve such guarantees or accept a world in which nuclearism will continue to cast its shadow over all aspects of nation building. It will be of interest to political scientists, policymakers, military analysts, and those interested hi the nuclear issue.
Categories: Nuclear arms control

The Nuclear Future

The Nuclear Future

Suggests alternative nuclear futures. Leebaert, Derek, ed. Soviet Military Thinking. London and Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1981. An authoritative collection of essays on the Soviet perspective. Legault, Albert, and George Lindsey.

Author: Michael Mandelbaum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501745287

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 914

While specifically defining many of the technical terms that have made this subject so inaccessible, Michael Mandelbaum discusses the weapons systems and nuclear doctrine of both the United States and the Soviet Union along with their predicted impact on the future of the arms race.
Categories: History

The United Kingdom and the Future of Nuclear Weapons

The United Kingdom and the Future of Nuclear Weapons

As explained above, there are good reasons to question all of these assumptions given the changes and developments likely to characterise and reshape the future deterrence environment. ALTERNATIVE NUCLEAR FUTURES: ASSESSING OPTIONS FOR ...

Author: Andrew Futter

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442265745

Category: Political Science

Page: 244

View: 339

This volume provides a study of the current UK nuclear program and related issues that reflect the complexity of the Trident weapons system and the changing nature of deterrence. Presenting the political, cultural, technical, and strategic aspects of Trident it provides a thoughtful overview of the UK’s complex relationship with nuclear weapons.
Categories: Political Science

Non nuclear Futures

Non nuclear Futures

It appears that no country can sustain a nuclear doubling time of three or four years for long enough to provide the major alternative energy source desired before the oil runs out. But it also appears that at rates and costs comparable ...

Author: Amory B. Lovins

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39076005248393

Category: Energy policy

Page: 223

View: 499

Categories: Energy policy

Better Safe Than Sorry

Better Safe Than Sorry

Abolition is therefore both the most desirable alternative nuclear future and the most difficult to achieve. Success would require, among other factors, cooperative, or at least nonthreatening, relations among major powers; ...

Author: Michael Krepon

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804770989

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 742

In 2008, the iconic doomsday clock of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientistswas set at five minutes to midnight—two minutes closer to Armageddon than in 1962, when John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev went eyeball to eyeball over missiles in Cuba! We still live in an echo chamber of fear, after eight years in which the Bush administration and its harshest critics reinforced each other's worst fears about the Bomb. And yet, there have been no mushroom clouds or acts of nuclear terrorism since the Soviet Union dissolved, let alone since 9/11. Our worst fears still could be realized at any time, but Michael Krepon argues that the United States has never possessed more tools and capacity to reduce nuclear dangers than it does today - from containment and deterrence to diplomacy, military strength, and arms control. The bloated nuclear arsenals of the Cold War years have been greatly reduced, nuclear weapon testing has almost ended, and all but eight countries have pledged not to acquire the Bomb. Major powers have less use for the Bomb than at any time in the past. Thus, despite wars, crises, and Murphy's Law, the dark shadows cast by nuclear weapons can continue to recede. Krepon believes that positive trends can continue, even in the face of the twin threats of nuclear terrorism and proliferation that have been exacerbated by the Bush administration's pursuit of a war of choice in Iraq based on false assumptions. Krepon advocates a "back to basics" approach to reducing nuclear dangers, reversing the Bush administration's denigration of diplomacy, deterrence, containment, and arms control. As he sees it, "The United States has stumbled before, but America has also made it through hard times and rebounded. With wisdom, persistence, and luck, another dark passage can be successfully navigated."
Categories: History

Nuclear Power in an Age of Uncertainty

Nuclear Power in an Age of Uncertainty

Alternative Nuclear Futures Under Strategy One : at the Salem , N.J. , reactor , which are viewed by the public as precursors to a major accident . Sec- ond , the new information on the small amount of radioactivity released in the ...

Author: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P00897315H

Category: Electric utilities

Page: 316

View: 485

Categories: Electric utilities

The Nuclear Future

The Nuclear Future

"Alternative U.S. Strategies and America's Future," Contract AF 49 (638)- 1249 (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Foreign Policy Research Institute, 1965). 17. Lynn Etheridge Davis, "Limited Nuclear Options: Deterrence and the ...

Author: Donald M. Snow

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN: UCAL:B4231090

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 749

Categories: History